Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Michael Ignatieff: Polls don't matter. Liberal.ca: Yes they do.

Make up your mind already Liberals.

Yesterday: Michael Ignatieff: "Polls don't matter."  said on his 'working families' tour while talking to seniors (not working families), before talking to rich Liberal donors (also not working families) and high school kids. Yup, again not working families, but at least he didn't overtly lie to the high-school kids this time.

Today: Liberal.ca: A poll released late last week shows two-thirds of Canadians fear that Prime Minister Harper will compromise....citing a poll to help make their case.  BTW Liberals, if these negotiations are supposed to be so secret, how come you know so much about them?



And speaking of polls that Ignatieff will not believe in:

'Superstar’ status in global economic poll strengthens Harper’s hand.

4 comments:

CanadianSense said...

Polls only matter if they support his narrative.

I should put up a a picture with Dion Miss me yet?

Ardvark said...

We should raise money for a billboard in Ottawa.

wilson said...

Liberals have made the same mistake over and over

1. Liberals misread the 2006 election results ,
sure that Canadians are just mad, but when they get a good taste of the Reformatories they will be back.
LPC can toss out any dude as leader, the brand is stong, a win is in the bag.

Under estimated Stephen Harper as a leader

2. Liberals were living in the Enchanted Forest when they thought Canadians would be okey dokey with a coalition of losers stealing government from the evil Harper,
after all, 63% of Cdns didn't vote for him, right?.

Under estimated Stephen Harper and his caucus.

3. Liberals biggest mistake was Iffy, folded arms, leaning back in his chair, and waiting for Harper to be beat down by 'events' during the economic crisis.

Under estimated Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

They have no idea what they are in for in this next election,
because they will again under estimate PM Harper and the CPC

Orville said...

At the committee meeting in December, although Oda did not give the name of the staffer who wrote in the "not" on the document in answer to the question - Who inserted the word "not" ? - because she actually was not physically present, when it was done, and therefore was unable to identify by name. At the same time, her machine generated signature was placed on the document. Her testimony has always been that all was done under her direction and recommendation.
At that same December meeting, how could anyone have left the meeting confused, whether it was Oda who made the decision to deny recommendation for approval of the funds for Karios, when the President of CIDA told the committee it was the minister Oda who was responsible. How much clearer could Ms. Beggs be when she spoke the following words to committee members and the media in December.

“I think as the minister said, the agency did recommend the project to the minister. She has indicated that. But it was her decision, after due consideration, to not accept the department’s advice. This is quite normal, and I certainly was aware of her decision. The inclusion of the word “not” is just a simple reflection of what her decision was, and she has been clear. So that’s quite normal,” she told the foreign affairs committee.”

For some members of the media and Liberal party to falsely claim that Oda changed her position in February will not stand up to scrutiny if her words in Hansard are examined where she stated

"I have repeatedly and clearly stated in response to questions in the House and at committee that the funding decision was mine. The “not” was inserted at my direction."

http://www2.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=40&Ses=3&DocId=4959259


How could anyone conclude and write that Oda changed her story or worse yet accuse her of lying? I think some opposition members and media should make a retraction and genuine apology to Ms. Oda, because there is no valid reason for them to be confused, to the extent that they demanded her resignation, and cause her all this anguish.
Fortunately Prime Minister Harper had the good sense to stand behind his persecuted minister, and not let the opposition destroy another female member of his cabinet, with unfounded charges.